How Is Pet Cremation Done?

Pets can be cremated either in usual crematories or the ones that are specifically dedicated for pet cremations. During the process, a pet’s body is placed in a cremation unit and subjected to high temperatures up to 1400-1800 degrees Fahrenheit.

Thus, the intense heat and vaporization reduce the organic matter to dust and dried bones. Next, the surgical, pins, rods, tags, broken pieces of collars, and other metal objects are removed from the dust with the help of a magnet or manual inspection.

Pet cremation urn

Finally, the cremains are pulverized to get a coarse sand-like powder with uniform consistency. These ashes are then poured in a sealed plastic bag, cardboard box, or tin and finally, returned to the owner.

You may then transfer the cremated remains in a nice cremation urn meant for holding the ashes of a pet.
Having received the ashes you may choose to scatter, store, or bury them.

More often than not, these remains are returned the same day or next day (unless it is a communal cremation).

The cremated remains are usually pale white in color. However, the color may vary due to certain medications or health issues.

The time for cremation depends on the type of pet you have. For instance, cremation of smaller animals such as birds, mice, rabbits, hamsters, does not take long.

On the other hand, larger animals like horse, large breeds of dogs, etc. are cremated in hours. On an average, though, cremation of a pet may take 45 minutes to two hours for more.

The weight of the cremation ashes also depends on the weight and bone structure of your beloved pet. Until the process of cremation begins, the pet is kept in a refrigerated cooler.

Private or Communal Pet Cremation

When choosing options for pet cremations, you may consider a private or a communal cremation. As the name suggests, private cremation refers to separate cremation of your pet whereas the latter means cremation of the pet with other animals as well.

If you select partition cremation, you may either ask the crematory to return the ashes to you for the final disposition or let the crematory staff scatter the cremains on the facility ground or memorial area and then send you a cremation certificate bearing the pet’s name and date of cremation.

As this option involves group cremation of several animals, the ashes of your beloved furry companion are likely to be mixed with those of other animals that were cremated in the same chamber.

In case of private cremation, you may request the crematorium personnel to allow you to view the cremation of your pet as it helps with the closure for the loss. The facility, however, may charge an added fee for this service.

You can choose a pet cremation service yourself or ask your beloved pet’s veterinarian or a local animal shelter to do so.

However, beware of cremation facilities that adopt illegal behavior by simply getting rid of the animal’s body elsewhere and handing over just dirt as cremation ash to the owners.

Thus, if you have asked your vet to make all the arrangements for your pet’s cremation, you can at least take the contact number of the crematory handling the process and ask the manager about the organization’s policies and procedures.

Resources:

The Association for Pet Loss and Bereavement, Aftercare: Pet Cemeteries and Crematories

International Association of Pet Cemeteries and Crematories, You Have Choices